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Alloy Effects, Phase Diagrams, Microstructure (Series Part 1 of 3)

$49.00
$49.00
$49.00
Available for Immediate Download/Access

Bi-Metallic Tooling

$49.00
$49.00
$49.00
Available for Immediate Download/Access

Die Design: Thermal Design Theory (Series Part 5 of 18)

$49.00
$49.00
$49.00
Available for Immediate Download/Access

Guidelines for Personal Protective Equipment in Die Casting

916-D
$10.00
$20.00
$20.00
Available for Immediate Download/Access

Guidelines for Personal Protective Equipment in Die Casting

916
$20.00
$40.00
$40.00

Integrated Modelling of Deformations and Stresses in the Die

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Structural high pressure die casting aluminum parts are widely used in the automotive industry. During casting and subsequent heat treatment, the casting experiences thermally induced stress formation and related distortion. The design of the part and the die, together with the process control and the choice of cooling and heat treatment parameters, have a significant impact on how the stresses and deformations evolve during the multiple manufacturing steps. The article presents a fully integrated approach in MAGMASOFT, to predict casting stresses and distortions for the full manufacturing chain, which has been applied to different industrial castings. The benefits are significant when dimensional tolerance problems are identified and resolved systematically in the design phase of the component or before tooling is manufactured.
Tuesday, December 10, 2019
12:00pm - 1:00pm Central Time


Cost:
Corporate Members:$49
Individual Members: $69
Non-Corporate Members:$99



Marking Methods for Die Castings

$49.00
$49.00
$49.00

Reducing Die Lubricant By Understanding the Importance of Dr

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Lubricant is necessary in the high pressure die casting process. Without it, the casting may not eject from the die. When the majority of the casting ejects but some cast alloy remains in localized areas it is called solderor dragging. In other cases, the casting may not eject from the die and is called a stuck casting.  Lubricant is generally effective at controlling stuck castings, but it is only partially effective at eliminating solder and dragging. It also may produce porosity and staining defects.  Die life is reduced due to heat checking that results from the thermal fatigue induced by the lubricant application. Numerous studies have attempted to eliminate lubricants in high pressure die casting, but none have been successful. Much of the previous work has assumed that the lubricant primarily prevents wetting and intermetallic phase formation; however, lubricant is still necessary when these mechanisms are mostly eliminated through the use of die coatings.  Thermomechanical interference is thus proposed as the primary factor that necessitates lubricant.  If interference is the main source of ejection force, high draft angles should eject easier than low draft angles because the draft creates a reaction force to aid in the pin ejection.  Draft angle should not change the ejection force if wetting and intermetallic phases are the mechanisms that resists ejection. To test this hypothesis, an experiment was developed to eject a core pin from a cylindrical casting at room temperature.  Pins with seven draft angles were produced and evaluated using this simple test. With multiple draft angles, it was possible to measure the coefficient of friction between aluminum and steel in situ. This coefficient was found as 0.62 which is close to that measured in static friction tests.  In addition, the experimental data was adequately fit by considering only thermomechanical interference. No additional terms were required to improve the model fit to the experimental data. Finally, alloy composition was not found to effect.
Wednesday, December 11, 2019
12:00pm - 1:00pm Central Time


Cost:
Corporate Members:$69
Individual Members: $99
Non-Corporate Members:$119


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Andy Ryzner
847.808.3165
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